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20130124
20130201
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
environment. how to get out beyond the walls of our facilities. how do we remain successful in the private sector while still securing our embassies and protecting our people in these environments? the review board correctly points out the department has been resource-challenged for many years. this has constrained our mission, and restricting the use of resources even for security has become a conditioned response. decisions about the security resources being made more on costs than value. the approach fails to recognize the diplomacy and foreign aid put down payments in terms of good will, open borders for the export of american products, protection of intellectual property, and, most importantly, cooperation on security and counterterrorism. there is a lot to discuss. welcome again. we appreciate your time. on a personal note, since this is likely to be your last hearing before this committee and your leadership will be missed, i speak for many when i say you have been an outstanding secretary of state. you have changed the face of america abroad, and extended the hospitable reach of ou
of coal. how do you feel growth without wrecking the environment? >> increasingly, it is coming at a huge cost. >> also in the program, we look at what is happening in the world of business. yet another strike in greece. >> the greek tragedy continues as the country comes to a standstill in a massive strike just days after the greek finance minister tells us things are looking good. this is the last year of recession, he said. the problem is that nobody seems to have told that to the millions of greek's on the ground -- greeks on the ground. it is midday in london, 2 p.m. in damascus, where syria has accused israel of carrying out an airstrike in its territory. there has been a reaction from bashar al-assad's allies in moscow. the foreign ministry there has condemn the attack. there is mounting concern about the react -- retaliation in israel itself. there are competing accounts of exactly what the targets were. it is thought that israel was trying to prevent the transfer of weapons to hezbollah militants in the area. >> israel has refused to comment on the reported out -- airstrikes. it
area, have appreciated the goals of our environment and climate change and doing everything that we can. i think the 80%, we're not going to be satisfied with that, spencer. we want 100% zero waste. this is where we're going. >> reporter: is that possible? >> i think it is. it is possible. >> reporter: san francisco residents sven eberlein and debra baida think it's possible, too. they are avid recyclers and composters, so much so that they produce almost no trash. baida lists what goes into the compost bin. >> we put wrappers from our butter, we put any meat or package, that kind of packaged paper food, soiled food wrappings, tissues, q-tips, paper napkins, which we don't have in our home. if those come in, those go there. soiled paper plates, milk cartons. >> i go to travel somewhere, and i'm, you know, i have, like, an apple and "where's the compost?" you know, and i have to throw it in the trash, and it kind of, you know, it just doesn't feel quite right, you know. >> reporter: but not all san franciscans are as enthusiastic as eberlein and baida. those who refuse to sort their garb
ceo survey released this week, 52% saw no change from the current tepid economic environment. 28% saw decline and 18% said things will get better. it is still an improvement from last year when 48% predicted a decline. the last few years of recovery followed by slow downs of political crisis, of new terror attacks from north africa have made people weary of excessive optimism. things are stable, crises have been contained, there's some growth on the horizon, but no one's ready to declare that we've turned any corners. there are no bulls in davos. no countries taking center stage. one symbol of the mood, the big splashy parties that companies like google used to throw have been quietly discontinued. not that google couldn't afford it, by the way. they just had their first year with $50 billion in revenues. underlying this caution, i believe, is a sense that growth that people had gotten used to, economic growth of the past that countries and companies had hoped for in the future just doesn't seem likely. the imf released a new report this week with growth numbers that are low. lower th
environment. 28% saw a decline and 18% said things will get better. it is still an improvement from last year, when 48% predicted a decline. the last few years of recovery, followed by slowdowns of political crisis, of new terror attacks from north africa, have made people wary of excessive optimism. these are stable, crises have been contained. there's some growth on the horizon, but no one's ready to declare that we have turned any corners. there are no bulls in davos this year, no countries taking center stage. one symbol of the mood, the big splashy parties that companies like google used to throw have been quietly discontinued. not that google couldn't afford it, they just had that their first year with $50 billion in revenue. it's a sense of growth that people have gotten used to, growth that companies have hoped for in the future just doesn't seem likely. growth numbers that are low, lower than they had projected only a few months ago. the world is coming to grips with the fact that the financial crisis might have ushered in not a few years, but a decades of slow growth. and we're not
them? >> yes, spencer, we actually do. not only does our department of the environment go out and do audits, we actually have auditors that go out there and make sure that we're all in compliance with the way we measure it, and using the state standards and the state process to do it. >> reporter: so there's no doubt in your mind that the 80% is real. >> oh, no doubt at all, no doubt at all in my mind. >> reporter: whatever the actual number is, recycling and composting don't come free. >> all of the services we provide are paid for by the customers whose material we're taking away. >> reporter: are they paying more in rates because of all this recycling and composting than they would otherwise? >> i would bet they're paying a little more. but if you compare rates in the bay area-- san francisco versus other communities-- we're right in the middle of the pack. and we're doing a lot more recycling than any other communities. >> reporter: residents currently pay about $28 a month for their trash bins; recycling and composting bins are free. but last month, recology requested a rate inc
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)

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